Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Chattanooga Horse Weathervane - - The Rest of The Story

Copyright 2014, CABS for Reflections From the Fence

Heather Wilkinson Rojo loves weathervanes.  She has a LONG running series of photos on Wednesdays of weather vanes.  I have shared two with her recently, the second being the horse weathervane from Chattanooga Tennessee.  Here is a different view from what is on her blog.

And, here is the building it sits atop, but, from the ground level.  This is Coolidge Park on the north side of the Tennessee River.

A sign I found outside the entrance of that building, well, my my, a carousel.  Alrighty now!

Inside that building we find the 1894 Dentzel carousel.

From that web site we learn that "The antique carousel was restored by local master wood carver Bud Ellis and a devoted team of craftspeople and volunteers at his studio "Horsing Around" located near Chattanooga."

The carousel has 52 whimsical hand carved animals, a calliope band organ, and ornate between gold leaf benches.

A pig, a giraffe and a horse (behind the pig).

Man's favorite, was the frog, with another giraffe nearby.  If you look beyond the frog, you can just pick out the ostrich with a "Uncle Sam" hat.

And, that is the rest of the story, a weathervane in the shape of a horse, and tucked under that roof, a wonderful carousel.


Sunday, April 27, 2014

Sunday's Stories, 52 Ancestor Weeks, Week # 17, Three Gehrke Infants

Copyright 2014, CABS for Reflections From the Fence

This is week 17 of my participation Amy Johnson Crow's, once a week challenge to blog about one ancestor a week, tell their story, biography, a photograph, an outline of a research problem — anything that focuses on that one ancestor. More about the challenge can be found at her Blog, No Story Too Small.

This week I will focus on three infant children of Karl Herman "Carl or Charles" Gehrke and his wife, Charlotte Louise Gruendemann-Grunbaum Gehrke, all three were born and died in Lihue, Kauai, Hawaii. All records presented are from the Lihue Lutheran Church records, Lihue, Kauai, Hawaii.  (See film available from FamilySearch and the LDS library system, film number 1031194 .)  Some of the records I found in this set of records were sent to Germany for translation.  You may note some "English" printing on the records, that is the efforts of the translator.

The first child is Albert Wilhelm August Gehrke, second son and third born child.  This particular presentation of his baptism record was taken from my work on the Gehrke clan, "The Gehrke's : Descendants of Karl and Charlotte Gehrke, Emigrants from Germany 1888", which I privately published in 1997.

Albert was born November 2, 1889 at Lihue, was baptized on December 8, 1889 at Lihue. 

His death record from the Lihue Lutheran Church records, which tell us that  Albert drowned in the stream of Kapain.  Albert died on May 17, 1895 at or near Lihue.  He was buried the next day, we suggest that burial was probably at the Lihue Lutheran Church although there is no marker for him. Presented as 2 images.

The next child is Julius Gehrke, fourth son and fifth child.  Julius was given an emergency baptism on the day that he died in the home of his parents who acted as his baptismal sponsors.  Julius was born on May 2, 1894 at Lihue and was baptized on May 14, 1894 just before his death.  Note that in the far left column his death date is given with the cross and date.  Baptism presented in 2 images. 

His death record.  The reason for his death was given as "weakly since birth".  The pastor indicated in his remarks on the recording of his death that the child died and was buried during "my absence".   We suggest, that as with his brother, that Julius was probably buried at the Lihue Lutheran Church, although there is no marker for him.  Death presented in two images.

The last child is Auguste Clara Sophie Gehrke, the tenth born and third daughter.  Auguste was baptized at home in an emergency baptism.  Her baptismal sponsors were Supervisor August Braun, Mrs. Clara Schumacher, nee Braun, Sophie Schilling all of Lihue, but all absent at the emergency baptism, but represented by Mrs. Schmidt, Mrs. Gehrke and Hedwig Gehrke.  The emergency baptism "was given in the house of the family Gehrke, the 12th child of the couple Gehrke, she died May 5, 1903" (This translation provided by friends and family of my daughter-in-law.  Translations done in Germany.)  You will note the record states the 12th child, and I have mentioned that she is the tenth born.  Yes, we seem to be missing 2 children.  I have not found them, yet.  I hold out hope, always hope.

Augusta Clara Sophie Gehrke, born the 15th of March 1903, baptized May 1, 1903 at the family home.  Her death is noted in the far left column.

Her death record, Auguste died on May 5, 1903 and we believed was buried the same day. Again, we suggest that she was buried at the Lihue Lutheran Church, although we have no proof.

Wish list for Gehrke infants:  Newspaper articles listing place of burial.  Possibly a pipe dream there.

Over all wish list for the Gehrke family unit, find those two missing babies!

* Additional source data can be obtained by contacting me, see the right hand column for a yahoo email address.

** 52 Ancestors Weeks Button courtesy of Amy Johnson Crow.

*** I use many resources to research, is a free site. is a pay site for which I pay, no discounts, etc.  None of these sites have asked me to review them, or use them.  See my Disclaimers page for further details.


Thursday, April 24, 2014

Treasure Chest Thursday, a New and Special Treasure

Copyright 2014, CABS for Reflections From the Fence

While visiting Statesboro Georgia, I had a wonderful meetup with a Bowen cousin.  It was a special day, yes, I blogged about it.

This special cousin gifted me with this tiny toy tea set.  A new and very special treasure. It will find it's new home with my other small treasures in one of my shadow boxes.

Thank you NLB.


Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Dunlawton Sugar Mill Gardens, Port Orange, Florida

Copyright 2014, CABS for Reflections From the Fence

At the suggestion and urging of friend Jan, Man and I made our last stop in the Daytona Beach area the Dunlawton Sugar Mill.  Jan assured us we would enjoy it, and as usual, she was spot on!

The history around the mill gardens has to do with Seminole Indians and the 2nd Seminole War in 1836.  You can read a short history of the gardens, here.  It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places (scroll down the page a bit).

The gardens is an interesting collection of relics from the sugar mill era, concrete critters from the days of   Bongoland  (M.D. "Manny" Lawrence in the 1950's created these 'critters') and of course, flora and fauna.  Due to the eclectic way this park is laid out, I am presenting the photos in the order they were taken.

Below, I am always impressed with philodendron, believe this is what we call split leaf, when we grow it as a house plant up in the northern states. Look how high it goes in the tree.  Special.

Croton, also grown as houseplants in the north, this is a beautiful specimen.

Animal powered rollers crushed the sugar cane.

I am a sucker for unusual ways to display plants, and it is a bromeliad.

The triceratops, from Bongoland, just hanging out.

Another bromeliad, tucked into the crook of this huge live oak.

The ruins of the sugar mill area has a new roof.  Below is a boiler which would produce steam to turn the mechanical stuff (a cane crusher) in the background, (or so Man tells me).

They boiled the sugar cane here, to produce cane juice. There were a number of these large kettles.

Chameleons scamper all around, rustling leaves, and now and then, sitting in the sun for Sony Too to capture:

From a pond area, a bit of whimsy:

As always, thanks Jan for the great suggestion. We enjoy a few quiet peaceful hours in the gardens, sitting, and just being there.


Daytona Beach

Copyright 2014, CABS for Reflections From the Fence

The weather was perfect for beach walking and lunch, and so, off we went to the beach again, this time Daytona Beach:

I actually posted the following photo to Facebook where I wrote:

When we got to the beach today they told us that the high tide was "high" enough that some of the vehicle entrances were closed. Also suggested that it would be a while before we would be able to get off the beach. Holy beach water. We are captive to the tide. Jolly needed his 4-wheel to get us parked.

It is a bit difficult to see, but, the tide is so far up that there is only one lane of traffic, then the beach chairs, then water.

Trikes this time and there is the pier where we will have a long lunch.  We ate on the VERY top, in the back (sea side not land side) outside, with the wonderful salt air and umbrellas.

After lunch, Sony Too and I went to the railing and had some fun.  Near fishing piers there always seems to be at least one pelican that is semi tame and a beggar.  See him sitting atop the light pole?

Take off:

He landed near this young man fishing.  I giggle wondering what that young man was really thinking about this pelican sitting so near.

On our walk back to Jolly I managed to capture, one plane, dragging a sign, one kite surfer and one dude looking for gold, all in one photo.  Play time at it's best, eh?

The day was not over, we had one garden to visit - -


Monday, April 21, 2014

A Ponce de Leon and Beach Kinda Day

Copyright 2014, CABS for Reflections From the Fence

As we left Florida for points east and north, we had stopped for a few nights near Daytona Beach.  One day we spent exploring the Ponce de Leon Inlet area, including several beaches, the Lighthouse, had a wonderful lunch and found more beaches.

We stopped to turn around, yep, a U turn, so we could go back to a beach parking area with room for Jolly, and I spied this house. Color abounds.  I would like to see inside, eh?

We turned around so we could briefly stop at the Winter Haven Park.  There is beach access.  Love the bike riding on the beach.  We would see this frequently.

Along the beach we do find flowers, and, I have to stop and take photos:

Next stop, Ponce de Leon Lighthouse.  175 feet tall, Florida's tallest.  You can read more here, as well as the official page.

There are several buildings that serve as museums.  Displays of lighthouse memorabilia, include, bottles found around the grounds from the days when the lighthouse had onsite keepers.  Bottles, one of my favorites:

Another display had this interesting traveling library:

Man inspecting a beacon, the lens and light source.

Living quarters, note the ice box in left background.  My grandmother had a couch similar to this, but, in a dark green.

Inside the lighthouse, looking up, and up, and up and - - -

We did not climb it, with 203 stairs, my memory of Trinidad California and the after affects of that climb reminded me, I am no spring chicken any more!

After we leisurely wandered around the lighthouse grounds we had lunch and it was back to the beaches!

You can see beach going lovers participating in just about any sport, here the boys are playing bocci ball.

There are several ways to play Bocci ball, the following description is pretty much how our clan plays.  Bocci ball involves a target, usually small like a golf ball.  The target ball is tossed first.  Your object is to toss the larger heavy bocci ball as close to the target as possible.  The game usually involves a great deal of measuring.  Man carries a rule in his pants pockets, handy for those all important measurements. These guys have their own unique method of measuring:

Jolly drives the beach:

These two took their beach bikes seriously, at least the tires, they were fat, those tires!

Another kind of bike on the beach.  No shirt, no helmet for the biker.  The passenger seems to have a different take on it, helmet on, shirt too!  LOL

Jump!  Catch that frisbee, ohhh, well, it is low to the ground.  And, gotta love the great sand castle.

Your beach umbrella and chairs await.  $35.00 a day for one umbrella and two chairs.

We had great weather, lots of sun and a wonderful day.